About Us

First Nations Health Consortium (FNHC) Enhanced Service Coordination; the link between the child and the needed program, service, supplies, equipment and support, in accessing education, health or social programs to meet the child’s needs.

Serving all First Nations people living on and off reserve in Alberta, FNHC strives to reduce the stress of navigating service systems and provide resource links to all Albertans.  FNHC is comprised of a multi-disciplinary team of nurses, educators and child & youth/social workers that share their knowledge of existing resources across the province allowing us to connect First Nation families to service providers, support families in the Jordan’s Principle application process and advocate for children, their families and communities.

A progressive and caring organization with representation from Treaty 6, 7 and 8, FNHC is funded by the Federal Government through Jordan’s Principle – Child First Initiative.

In 2007, the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society advocated for all First Nations and Inuit children to receive supports and services through the creation of Jordan's Principle: A Child-First Initiative. This initiative calls upon the government of first contact to ensure First Nations and Inuit children have access to public services on the same terms as other children.  As a result of multiple Canadian Human Rights Tribunal (CHRT) rulings, First Nations and Inuit children now have equal access to health, social and education services both on and off reserve through Jordan’s Principle.

Jordan River Anderson was a First Nation child from Norway House Cree First Nation born with complex medical needs that required hospitalization. When Jordan was 2 years old his medical team determined he could go home with the aid of in-home care. However, there was a payment dispute between the Province of Manitoba and the Federal government as to who would pay for his in-home services. Jordan did not get to go home to his family and community and died in the hospital at the age of 5.